THE JADE KINGDOM

In China, no other stone was or is valued so highly. In the Middle Kingdom, jade played a role similar to that of gold and diamonds in the West.
In a tradition that developed over the millennia, Chinese craftsmen advanced the working of jade to perfection. Revered as the stone of the gods, jade was reserved for kings and emperors. The link between the gemstone and the display of power and authority found perfect expression in the mythical jade emperor Yu Di.
The oldest Chinese dictionary defines jade as “beauty in stone with five virtues”: human understanding, modesty, wisdom, justice, and courage – virtues that should still determine the way we treat people.

A UNIQUE AURA

Bringer of luck, symbol of power, elixir of immortality – jade has always been surrounded by a special aura.

From the earliest times, advanced cultures created jade objects of fascinating variety. The great jewellers of the Art Deco period discovered jade for their luxurious creations. Before then, the Russian goldsmith Fabergé – famous for his opulent jewellery – had already created artistic desk utensils from jade.

That unique symbolic and creative energy naturally predestined the green gemstone for a special role in celebrating Faber-Castell’s 250th anniversary. Eight segments of jade symbolize the eight generations that have made their mark on the family firm to date. In reference to the year when the company was founded, this exclusive edition is limited to 1761 pens.

BEAUTY IN STONE

Jade is remarkably hard and resists efforts to work it – a fact that has inspired craftsmen through the ages to supreme feats.

Extraordinary skill is required to bring out the astonishing qualities of this gemstone. The Pen of the Year 2011 uses Russian jade. This emerald-coloured nephrite is delicately mottled; its deep green exhibits some appealing shadings. The jade is found in Siberia, but the exact location has always been one of the dealers’ best-kept secrets. Even today, the hunt for jade is something of an adventure.

MASTERFUL IN EVERY DETAIL

Numerous processing steps are required before a piece of jade can be inserted into the Pen of the Year.

From the first slice of the raw stone to the final polish, the craftsman must recognize its unique nuances and bring out jade’s natural gleam. Only very experienced jewellers can achieve that. None but a genuine artist can master the cuts typical of jade. Piece by piece, he chisels out a masterpiece in stone.

A platinum-plated frame encases the individual pieces of jade, making the pen a special piece of jewellery. The elaborate faceting of the stones on the barrel and cap is the crowning glory of the Pen of the Year. Immaculately faceted and polished, the jade is given its final and perfect form by a master craftsman of the Stephan gemstone manufactury. He is backed up by the long tradition of the Idar Oberstein workshops, that were set up in the 15th century and now enjoy a world-wide reputation.

HIGH QUALITY PRESENTATION

The Pen of the Year 2011

Each individually numbered pen comes in an exclusive wooden case. The green lid, polished repeatedly to a high gloss, perfectly reflects the colour of the jade.

The accompanying certificate bears the personal signature of Count Anton Wolfgang von Faber-Castell, attesting to the limited edition of the Pen of the Year 2011.

A TRUE WORK OF ART

Jade makes the Pen of the Year 2011 a luxurious writing implement and a collector’s item. The 18-carat bicolour gold nib is available in line widths M, F, and B, each one ‘run in’ by hand. The platinum-plated end cap protects the twist knob for the filling mechanism.

Limited to: 1.761 fountain pens